After an Accident: What’s my Vehicle’s Repair Status?

auto-accidentl-videoHave you ever been involved in an auto accident that required repairs to your car? Once you file your claim and your vehicle goes in the shop, you may not see it until it is returned to you, often several days later. Have you ever wondered what goes on while it is at the shop? And what if they find additional damages? Here is typically what happens during the auto repair process.

Once your vehicle is brought into the shop, it’s moved into the line of vehicles to be repaired. Depending on the shop you use, it may be repaired by the same technician throughout the entire repair process. Other shops might complete the repairs using a station system with different technicians working on your car. Generally speaking, most shops use the same repair process from start to finish.

First, the vehicle is disassembled to check for any additional damages. Regardless of who wrote the estimate for damages, the technician does not have X-ray vision and cannot see the possible hidden damage underneath the panels. If any supplemental damages are found, they request authorization to order the additional parts while they begin repairing what they can from the original estimate. This ensures no time is wasted during the repair process.

After the vehicle has been taken apart and supplemental damages are found, they begin with the major portions of the repairs. They will remove the parts that can be repaired instead of replaced, as well as cut and place new parts back onto the vehicle.

Next, the vehicle is taken over to the paint shop for the final paint and refinishing touches. Depending on the kind of vehicle you have or the damage it sustained, this portion may take some time. Paint work often depends on the weather; if it is too hot or too cold, it can affect the finished product. Quite often, parts that are adjacent to the area that was repaired or replaced need to be painted in order to match the remaining color of the vehicle. This is called blending.

Finally, once the painting is complete, the vehicle is almost ready to go. Typically, a repair shop will spend one day to refinish and clean the vehicle, which is also when any final reassembly is done. It’s at this point you can expect a call from the shop to pick up your vehicle.

While I never want you to experience vehicle repairs due to an accident, hopefully you have a better understanding of how the repair process works. Remember, reach out to your independent agent and claims representative so they can help you through the process.

7 Comments on “After an Accident: What’s my Vehicle’s Repair Status?

  1. I had never considered what the shop does if they find any additional problems than what they originally expected. It’s nice to know that they don’t just repair it without your permission. I haven’t been in an accident that has required me to repair my car, but in case I ever do, this article was a nice read to help me understand the procedure.

    Like

  2. Thank you for the post! I work at a repair shop, so many people do not understand the steps we have to take to repair their vehicle correctly. We have to make sure we find all related damages, otherwise, if something happens to their vehicle all because something wasn’t repaired or repaired properly we would be at fault. And you’re on point about painting in weather conditions! I’m going to share this on our facebook page! Thank you again!

    Like

  3. I remembered the first time I got into an accident it took three months to get my car back. Now I drive carefully so this doesn’t happen to me again.

    Like

  4. Thanks for explaining the repair process and what considerations are taken into account. I actually didn’t know that a vehicle is taken apart to look for additional damages, but I can see how this would be important. After all, you can’t determine what’s wrong with a vehicle just from seeing it from the outside, just like you can judge a person by the cover.

    Like

  5. Taylor,

    Exactly! We always want to make sure we are taking into account all the related damages and sometimes you just cannot tell until the shop takes off some of the parts.

    Thanks for your comment!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: